New Review Paper: Argument Structure Alternations and Event Construal

Hot off the presses! Eva has a new paper in Psychology of Learning and Motivation about the relationship between grammar and event construal.

Abstract:
The most fundamental function of language is to enable people to share mental models of their worlds. For a comprehender, the given mental model she is building will be shaped by the lexical items, and also by the syntactic structures, that a speaker is using. In this chapter, I review literature that unearths the mental models formed by comprehenders, based on the grammatical structure they encounter, as mutually informative for both linguistic theory and event and object cognition. This chapter uses the well-studied case of light verb constructions and reviews data from a range of experimental studies that investigated how linguistic structure shapes core aspects of mental models: the conceptualization of event participants, and temporal structure in events.

LCL goes to SALA 2018!

The Language Comprehension Lab will give a talk and present a poster at this year’s South Asian Languages Analysis Roundtable (SALA) in Konstanz, Germany.

“Peeling oranges in Hindi: Ergative case-marking as cue in real-time event construal”
Poster by Eva Wittenberg and Ashwini Vaidya

“Frequency regulates argument sharing effects in Hindi light verb constructions”
Talk by Ashwini Vaidya and Eva Wittenberg

LCL has two posters @ CUNY!

The Language Comprehension Lab will be presenting two posters at this year’s CUNY:

“The mess reveals the system: People use top-down cues to resolve errors in contexts with highly random noise, but not with highly structured noise”
by Suhas Arehalli and Eva Wittenberg

“This is the structure that we wonder why anyone produces it: Resumptive pronouns in English hinder comprehension”
by Adam Morgan, Titus von der Malsburg, Victor S. Ferreira and Eva Wittenberg

LCL goes to AMLaP Asia 2018!

The Language Comprehension Lab is having two talks at the AMLaP-Asia 2018 conference in Hyderabad, India:

“This is the structure that we wonder why anyone produces it: Resumptive pronouns in English hinder comprehension”
Talk by Adam Morgan, Titus von der Malsburg, Victor S. Ferreira and Eva Wittenberg

“Frequency effects modulate argument sharing effects in Hindi LVCs”
Talk by Ashwini Vaidya and Eva Wittenberg

LCL goes to CAMP 2017!

The California Meeting on Psycholinguistics is being held at UCLA on December 2nd-3rd, and our lab will be there to give three talks:

This is the structure that we wonder why anyone produces it: Resumptive pronouns in English hinder comprehension.
Talk by Adam Morgan, Titus von der Malsburg, Victor S. Ferreira, & Eva Wittenberg.

Subcategorization preferences of verbs reveal syntactic processing in evoked intracranial potentials.
Talk by Adam Morgan, Erik Kaestner, Victor S. Ferreira, Meilin Zhan, & Eric Halgren.

The mess reveals the system: People use top-down cues to resolve errors in contexts with highly random noise, but not with highly structured noise.
Talk by Suhas Arehalli & Eva Wittenberg.

New Commentary in Behavioral and Brain Sciences: Priming is swell, but it’s far from simple, by Jayden Ziegler, Jesse Snedeker, and Eva Wittenberg

Abstract:

Clearly, structural priming is a valuable tool for probing linguistic
representation. But we don’t think that the existing results provide strong
support for Branigan & Pickering’s (B&P’s) model, largely because the
priming effects are more confusing and diverse than their theory would
suggest. Fortunately, there are a number of other experimental tools
available, and linguists are increasingly making use of them.

Read the commentary here!